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Upcoming Events

Here you will find details about upcoming events and past events.

The Complete Works: Jackie Kay

15 September 2019, HOME

 

Editor, critic & broadcaster Ellah Wakatama Allfrey OBE presents the first in a brand-new annual series of in-depth interviews at HOME, in partnership with Creative Manchester. At this event Ellah will interview Jackie Kay, who is the National Poet for Scotland, Chancellor of the University of Salford and the award winning author and playwright of Red Dust Road and The Adoption Papers.

See the event page for more information and to book.

 

The Complete Works: Gary Younge

1 October 2019, HOME

 

Editor, critic & broadcaster Ellah Wakatama Allfrey OBE presents the first in a brand-new annual series of in-depth interviews at HOME, in partnership with Creative Manchester. At this event Ellah will interview Gary Younge, who is a broadcaster and columnist for The Guardian, and an award-winning author of five books including Another Day in the Death of America.

See the event page for more information and to book.

 

The Complete Works: Kamila Shamsie

28 November 2019, HOME

 

Editor, critic & broadcaster Ellah Wakatama Allfrey OBE presents the first in a brand-new annual series of in-depth interviews at HOME, in partnership with Creative Manchester. At this event Ellah will interview Kamila Shamsie, who is the author of seven acclaimed novels including Home Fire, which was longlisted for the 2017 Man Booker Prize and won the 2018 Women’s Prize for fiction. Kamila is Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing at the Centre for New Writing and a Patron of The Manchester Literature Festival.

See the event page for more information and to book.

The Complete Works: Christina Lamb

16 December 2019, HOME

 

Editor, critic & broadcaster Ellah Wakatama Allfrey OBE presents the first in a brand-new annual series of in-depth interviews at HOME, in partnership with Creative Manchester. At this event Ellah will interview Christina Lamb, who is one of Britain’s leading foreign correspondents, and the author of eight books including I Am Malala and The Girl from Aleppo: Nujeen’s Escape from War to Freedom in a Wheelchair.

See the event page for more information and to book.

 

The Complete Works: Aminatta Forna

20 January 2019, HOME

 

Editor, critic & broadcaster Ellah Wakatama Allfrey OBE presents the first in a brand-new annual series of in-depth interviews at HOME, in partnership with Creative Manchester. At this event Ellah will interview Aminatta Forna, whose novels Happiness and The Hired Man have have been translated into twenty two languages. Aminatta’s essays, meanwhile, have appeared in Freeman’s, Granta, The Guardian, LitHubThe Nation, The New York Review of Books, The Observer and Vogue. She has also penned stories for BBC radio and written and presented television documentaries including The Lost Libraries of Timbuktu (BBC Television, 2009) and Girl Rising (CNN, 2013).

See the event page for more information and to book.

Past events

Peterloo Now: Is devolution the way to a healthier democracy?

2 July 2019, Manchester Central Library

 

Has devolution invigorated our democracy and led to a more representative and represented Manchester?

Supported by Creative Manchester, this event is part of Peterloo Now, a series of four panel discussions on the nature of democracy and protest today, two centuries on from the clashes on St Peter’s Fields in August 1819. Presented by The University of Manchester in partnership with The Guardian, Peterloo Now is part of Manchester Histories Festival, who, this year, will be leading on the plans to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the Peterloo Massacre.

See the event page for more information and to book.

 

 

Schools’ Poetry Competition Celebration Day

2 July 2019, the Martin Harris Centre

 

Creative Manchester and the Centre for New Writing present a Celebration Day for the 2019 Schools’ Poetry Competition.

This initiative, now in its third year, has been developed in partnership with three local high schools, supporting the University’s commitment to social responsibility.

The competition was launched in each school on World Poetry Day by PhD students from the Centre for New Writing. Since then, the PhD students have spent several weeks mentoring the school students, providing support and encouragement to pen their own poems themed around ‘Culture’, and enter them into the competition.

The winning school students will be invited to perform their poetry at the Celebration Day on the 2 July.

Attendance is by invitation only.

 

 

Lemn Sissay and Dave Haslam in conversation

27 June 2019, Didsbury Arts Festival

 

A double bill featuring one of the nation’s best loved poets, Lemn Sissay MBE, and DJ and acclaimed writer Dave Haslam. Lemn will be reading poems and exclusively discussing My Name is Why, his forthcoming memoir exploring his early life in the institutional care system, race, family and the meaning of home (published by Canongate, August 2019).

Dave will be reading from his recent autobiography Sonic Youth Slept On My Floor, and his new work A Life in 35 Boxes, a ‘mini-book’ about collecting. Together they will be in discussion (expect entertainment, insight, emotion, and a few unexpected diversions) with an opportunity for an audience Q&A too. The evening will conclude with a book signing session.

See the event page for more information about this SOLD OUT event.

Peterloo Now: AI and the fourth industrial revolution  

25 June 2019, Manchester Central Library

 

Will the 4th industrial revolution and AI irreversibly transform the world of work for the 21st century?

Supported by Creative Manchester, this event is part of Peterloo Now, a series of four panel discussions on the nature of democracy and protest today, two centuries on from the clashes on St Peter’s Fields in August 1819. Presented by The University of Manchester in partnership with The Guardian, Peterloo Now is part of Manchester Histories Festival, who, this year, will be leading on the plans to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the Peterloo Massacre.

See the event page for more information and to book.

 

 

Peterloo Now: The gaps in representation

18 June 2019, Manchester Central Library

 

How can we ensure that the voices in politics reflect our society? Is there a way for all to feel as though they are represented in our political system?

Supported by Creative Manchester, this event is part of Peterloo Now, a series of four panel discussions on the nature of democracy and protest today, two centuries on from the clashes on St Peter’s Fields in August 1819. Presented by The University of Manchester in partnership with The Guardian, Peterloo Now is part of Manchester Histories Festival, who, this year, will be leading on the plans to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the Peterloo Massacre.

See the event page for more information and to book.

 

 

Community Festival

15 June 2019, The University of Manchester

 

Ever fancied walking on custard? How about trying your hand at making your own 3D model? Or perhaps you’d like to journey around sites of world-changing discoveries within the University of Manchester? Our free Community Festival is jam-packed with fun activities for all the family. Whether you want to get hands-on or just want to listen to some fascinating stories and watch music performance from across the city, we’ve got it covered.

On 15 June we’re inviting you and all our neighbours in the local community to go behind the scenes of the University and discover the exciting work taking place here. From puppet theatre to live music to language taster sessions, Creative Manchester has a whole lot planned!

See the event page for more information about this free event.

 

 

Peterloo Now: The roots of protest 

11 June 2019, Manchester Central Library

 

As protests gather with increasing regularity and in swelling numbers, could we be seeing the roots of a Peterloo in 2019?

Supported by Creative Manchester, this event is part of Peterloo Now, a series of four panel discussions on the nature of democracy and protest today, two centuries on from the clashes on St Peter’s Fields in August 1819. Presented by The University of Manchester in partnership with The Guardian, Peterloo Now is part of Manchester Histories Festival, who, this year, will be leading on the plans to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the Peterloo Massacre.

See the event page for more information and to book.

 

 

International Photography Competition Awards Ceremony

5 June 2019, South Foyer of the Samuel Alexander Building

 

Creative Manchester, in partnership with The Manchester China Institute (MCI), launched the University’s first International Photography Competition this spring. The competition was themed around ‘What Does Friendship Mean to You?’, and people across both China and the UK offered some wonderful responses. After receiving a huge number of entries, a shortlisting process took place, before the top 30 photos were exhibited in the Samuel Alexander Building’s South Foyer.

The awards ceremony takes place in the same location on the 5 June. Manchester China Institute Director Peter Gries and Creative Manchester Director Alessandro Schiesaro will award three prizes: the UK and China £1,000 grand prize winners, selected by an expert jury, and one £500 People’s Choice Award, selected online.

Entry is free of charge and there is no need to book. To find out more about the competition, see the International Photography Competition webpage.

 

 

GESTURES: Writing That Moves Between

15-16 February 2019, Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester

 

Artwork

This 2-day conference seeks to enliven critical debates of what has come to be invariably known as ‘experimental,’ ‘hybrid’ and ‘art writing’.

How might this re-thinking of ‘gesture’ disrupt conventional forms and ideologies, and open up new dialogues that traverse art and writing practices?

How might ‘gesture’ help us to reconsider the relation between writing and bodies?

What can ‘gesture’ do for multiple gender, sexual and race identities?

See the event page for more information on the conference and how to register.

 

Relaxed Performance Festive Concert

14 December 2018, Martin Harris Centre for Music and Drama, Manchester

Musician at relaxed performance with guests

Manchester University Music Society host this special festive concert, open to everybody in a relaxed setting.

The event is intended specifically to be sensitive to and accepting of audience members who may benefit from a more relaxed environment, including (but not limited to) those with autistic spectrum conditions, anyone with a learning disability or a sensory and communication disorder.

See the event page for more information and how to register. Entry is free of charge.

 

 

Digital Humanities Colloquium 2018

12 December 2018, Room 2.19, Samuel Alexander Building

This year’s event is entitled ‘Digital Approaches to Ancient and Modern Texts’. We hope that the event will attract an audience not only of classicists and ancient historians, but anticipate that by showcasing classicists’ deployment of digital approaches we are also able to initiate conversations with those who take digitally-informed approaches to medieval and modern texts.

For further information and to book please go to the Eventbrite page.

Places limited to a maximum of 30, so we advise early booking. The Colloquium will begin with lunch at 1pm.

Please email Josephine Lewis (josephine.lewis-2@manchester.ac.uk) by 6 December if you have any dietary requirements.

 

 

World War I Centenary Performance: Between the Lines

7 December 2018, The University of Manchester

WWI soldiers

An outdoor, site-responsive performance in the University’s Old Quadrangle exploring the impact of World War I on the University community.

The performance has been devised and will be performed by undergraduate Drama students drawing on the writings and memoirs of their predecessors who experienced the war.

See the event page for more information. Entry is free of charge and you don’t have to book.

 

 

Language and Identity: Explorations Through Film

10 November 2018, former Cornerhouse building, Manchester

The dynamic relationship between languages and the different community identities to which they are linked can be explored innovatively through film.

This ESRC Festival of Social Science event will showcase four short films made by graduates of The University of Manchester’s Visual Anthropology MA programme, who are now independent filmmakers.

They address themes from the Manchester-led, Arts and Humanities Research Council-funded ‘Cross-Language Dynamics: Reshaping Community’ research project, which supported the films. Languages ranging from Arabic, indigenous languages of Mexico and South Africa, and ‘Spanglish’ are featured.

See the event page for more information and how to register. Entry is free of charge.

 

 

Robots vs Loneliness?

6 November 2018, Manchester Cathedral

 

Robots

Can robots tackle loneliness? Can they truly tackle loneliness, though? Or, given that they are machines rather than persons, do they risk making people feel lonelier than ever?

In this interactive ESRC Festival of Social Science event, hosted by Dr Scott Midson (Lincoln Theological Institute, University of Manchester), a panel of experts from different fields will discuss some of the priorities and risks of social robots.

See the event page for more information and how to register. Entry is free of charge.

 

 

Match, Compare, Classify and Annotate: Computer Vision for the Digital Humanities

4 June 2018, 2pm – 5pm, Room A1.12, Samuel Alexander Building

Dr Giles Bergel, University of Oxford

Computer vision has made rapid progress in recent years: computers can now reliably match the same image; find differences in similar images; and classify content within multiple images. Recently (and controversially) computers have also begun to be able to identify subjects, such as people and places.

This hands-on session will show how to install and use state-of-the-art open source software from the University of Oxford’s Visual Geometry Group. Attendees will leave the session with the knowledge of how to match, differentiate, classify and annotate content within many kinds of images.

The event will also include a short presentation of Dr Guyda Armstrong’s Envisioning Dante project, a partnership between the John Rylands Research Institute and the Oxford Seebibyte Research Group, which is using these tools to classify and analyse the page design of early printed editions of Dante’s Divine Comedy held in the Rylands Special Collections.

Requirements: a laptop or tablet is needed to access online demos. Attendees who would like to try the software on their own laptops will need to install Docker, ideally in advance of the session (see links to the various platforms under Docker Version. There is no need to install the tools themselves or the training data as this will be supplied on the day).

In addition, Giles will be available on the following dates and times for short consultations with those wishing to discuss their research cases:

University Campus: Tuesday June 5, Room A1.03, Samuel Alexander Building 2pm – 5pm

The John Rylands Library, Deansgate: Wednesday June 6 in the Atrium (ground floor)

This workshop is offered in association with The John Rylands Research Institute.